Jkhkjgh – Сustom Literature essay

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.. Realism and ExpressionismJanuary 2001 Realism and Expressionism (sometimes called Formalism) are terms used to describe two stylistic tendencies in film. In the abstract, they can be considered polar extremes, but to do so clouds the nature of each style. In fact, they are not mutually exclusive; they can and almost always do appear in the same film, often in the same sequences and same shots. In practice, the terms do not exist at the polar extremities.

The thing to remember is that they are stylistic tendencies. Probably no film ever made was done completely in one style or the other. The aim of users of both styles is to make reality visible. Realism is a cinematic style that tends to find reality through observation of the actual, physical world. Manipulation by the filmmaker is kept to a minimum

The realist tries, as far as possible, to preserve our natural sense of time and space. Realism is essentially an Aristotelian concept: we know the world through close observation and inference. (Some films that lean toward realism: The Harmonists, Apollo 13, The Ice Storm, Living in Oblivion, Saving Private Ryan, Clerks, Persuasion, Secrets and Lies, Fargo, Shakespeare in Love.) Expressionism (or Formalism) is a cinematic style that tends to find reality through the manipulation of the physical world. Expressionist filmmakers use various cinematic devices to emphasize details that they believe give the essence of reality. They are more likely than realists to alter our sense of time and space. Expressionism is essentially a Platonic concept: we know the world by finding the form or essence of reality that underlies the illusory world we perceive through our senses.

(Some films that lean toward expressionism: Deep Blue Sea; Natural Born Killers; American Beauty; Run Lola Run; Trainspotting; Eyes Wide Shut; Citizen Kane; MI 2; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; most cartoons.) Realism and ExpressionismJanuary 2001 Realism and Expressionism (sometimes called Formalism) are terms used to describe two stylistic tendencies in film. In the abstract, they can be considered polar extremes, but to do so clouds the nature of each style. In fact, they are not mutually exclusive; they can and almost always do appear in the same film, often in the same sequences and same shots. In practice, the terms do not exist at the polar extremities. The thing to remember is that they are stylistic tendencies.

Probably no film ever made was done completely in one style or the other. The aim of users of both styles is to make reality visible. Realism is a cinematic style that tends to find reality through observation of the actual, physical world. Manipulation by the filmmaker is kept to a minimum. The realist tries, as far as possible, to preserve our natural sense of time and space. Realism is essentially an Aristotelian concept: we know the world through close observation and inference.

(Some films that lean toward realism: The Harmonists, Apollo 13, The Ice Storm, Living in Oblivion, Saving Private Ryan, Clerks, Persuasion, Secrets and Lies, Fargo, Shakespeare in Love.) Expressionism (or Formalism) is a cinematic style that tends to find reality through the manipulation of the physical world. Expressionist filmmakers use various cinematic devices to emphasize details that they believe give the essence of reality. They are more likely than realists to alter our sense of time and space. Expressionism is essentially a Platonic concept: we know the world by finding the form or essence of reality that underlies the illusory world we perceive through our senses. (Some films that lean toward expressionism: Deep Blue Sea; Natural Born Killers; American Beauty; Run Lola Run; Trainspotting; Eyes Wide Shut; Citizen Kane; MI 2; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; most cartoons.) Realism and ExpressionismJanuary 2001 Realism and Expressionism (sometimes called Formalism) are terms used to describe two stylistic tendencies in film. In the abstract, they can be considered polar extremes, but to do so clouds the nature of each style.

In fact, they are not mutually exclusive; they can and almost always do appear in the same film, often in the same sequences and same shots. In practice, the terms do not exist at the polar extremities. The thing to remember is that they are stylistic tendencies. Probably no film ever made was done completely in one style or the other. The aim of users of both styles is to make reality visible. Realism is a cinematic style that tends to find reality through observation of the actual, physical world.

Manipulation by the filmmaker is kept to a minimum. The realist tries, as far as possible, to preserve our natural sense of time and space. Realism is essentially an Aristotelian concept: we know the world through close observation and inference. (Some films that lean toward realism: The Harmonists, Apollo 13, The Ice Storm, Living in Oblivion, Saving Private Ryan, Clerks, Persuasion, Secrets and Lies, Fargo, Shakespeare in Love.) Expressionism (or Formalism) is a cinematic style that tends to find reality through the manipulation of the physical world. Expressionist filmmakers use various cinematic devices to emphasize details that they believe give the essence of reality. They are more likely than realists to alter our sense of time and space.

Expressionism is essentially a Platonic concept: we know the world by finding the form or essence of reality that underlies the illusory world we perceive through our senses. (Some films that lean toward expressionism: Deep Blue Sea; Natural Born Killers; American Beauty; Run Lola Run; Trainspotting; Eyes Wide Shut; Citizen Kane; MI 2; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; most cartoons.) Realism and ExpressionismJanuary 2001 Realism and Expressionism (sometimes called Formalism) are terms used to describe two stylistic tendencies in film. In the abstract, they can be considered polar extremes, but to do so clouds the nature of each style. In fact, they are not mutually exclusive; they can and almost always do appear in the same film, often in the same sequences and same shots. In practice, the terms do not exist at the polar extremities.

The thing to remember is that they are stylistic tendencies. Probably no film ever made was done completely in one style or the other. The aim of users of both styles is to make reality visible. Realism is a cinematic style that tends to find reality through observation of the actual, physical world. Manipulation by the filmmaker is kept to a minimum. The realist tries, as far as possible, to preserve our natural sense of time and space.

Realism is essentially an Aristotelian concept: we know the world through close observation and inference. (Some films that lean toward realism: The Harmonists, Apollo 13, The Ice Storm, Living in Oblivion, Saving Private Ryan, Clerks, Persuasion, Secrets and Lies, Fargo, Shakespeare in Love.) Expressionism (or Formalism) is a cinematic style that tends to find reality through the manipulation of the physical world. Expressionist filmmakers use various cinematic devices to emphasize details that they believe give the essence of reality. They are more likely than realists to alter our sense of time and space. Expressionism is essentially a Platonic concept: we know the world by finding the form or essence of reality that underlies the illusory world we perceive through our senses. (Some films that lean toward expressionism: Deep Blue Sea; Natural Born Killers; American Beauty; Run Lola Run; Trainspotting; Eyes Wide Shut; Citizen Kane; MI 2; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; most cartoons.).

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